op cit

Oct 21

Victor Erice, El espiritu de la colmena,1973
op. cit., p. 199-200

Victor Erice, El espiritu de la colmena,1973

op. cit., p. 199-200

Oct 18

—The Eye, Ibn al-Haytham (Alhazen, c. 965–1038), from Opticae thesaurus Alhazeni Arabis, 1572op. cit., p. 238

The Eye, Ibn al-Haytham (Alhazen, c. 965–1038), from Opticae thesaurus Alhazeni Arabis, 1572

op. cit., p. 238

blind spot

"It appears by a simple experiment, for the principle of which we are indebted to Mariotte, that the small portion of the retina corresponding to the entrance of the optic nerve, is incapable of exciting visual sensation though it receive the image of an object. Place the thumbs together at arm’s length, shut the left eye and fix the right eye steadily on the left thumb; then the right thumb if moved gradually outwards (so that its image on the retina of course traverses inwards), ceases to be visible in a particular spot, but is again seen beyond it. It will be remembered that the fibrous lamina of the gray nervous layer of the retina is here evolving itself from the nerve, and is not yet invested with the vesicular or other laminæ; a circumstance of great interest in regard to the modus operandi of the constituents of the retina in vision.”

—Robert Bentley Todd and William Bowman, The Physiological Anatomy and Physiology of Man, 1850, p. 435

op. cit., p. 238

Oct 15

Radio Row, Cortland Street, New York City, April 8, 1936, Berenice Abbott
The shops of Radio Row and the surrounding streets were demolished in 1966 to make way for the construction of the World Trade Center.
op. cit., p. 59

Radio Row, Cortland Street, New York City, April 8, 1936, Berenice Abbott

The shops of Radio Row and the surrounding streets were demolished in 1966 to make way for the construction of the World Trade Center.

op. cit., p. 59

Oct 14

crescent -

Crescent from the 1964 album of the same name by the John Coltrane Quartet (with McCoy Tyner, Jimmy Garrison, and Elvin Jones).

op. cit., p. 182

noeme

“It is often said that it was the painters who invented Photography (by bequeathing it their framing, the Albertian perspective, and the optic of the camera obscura). I say: no, it was the chemists. For the noeme “That-has-been” was possible only on the day when a scientific circumstance (the discovery that silver halogens were sensitive to light) made it possible to recover and print directly the luminous rays emitted by a variously lighted object. The photograph is literally an emanation of the referent. From a real body, which was there, proceed radiations which ultimately touch me, who am here; the duration of the transmission is insignificant; the photograph of the missing being, as Sontag says, will touch me like the delayed rays of a star.”

—Roland Barthes, Camera Lucida, p. 80–81

For noeme, see this.

op. cit., p. 5, p. 111

Oct 01

Jacob Matham after Hendrick Goltzius, Whale Stranded at Berckhey, 1598. Hart Nautical Collections, M.I.T. Museum, Cambridge, Mass.
op. cit., p. 51

Jacob Matham after Hendrick Goltzius, Whale Stranded at Berckhey, 1598. Hart Nautical Collections, M.I.T. Museum, Cambridge, Mass.

op. cit., p. 51

stranded

“Adrian Van der Donk, M. D. who had resided nine years in this state, when called New Netherland, and who published in the Dutch language, in 1655, a topographical and Natural History of New Netherland, &c. says, that the Hudson, the Mohawk, and all the waters of the country, abound with every kind of fish in their respective seasons, and that in March, 1647, at the time of a great freshet, two whales of considerable bulk, went up the Hudson one hundred and sixty miles; one of them, however, returned and grounded about forty-eight miles from the sea shore, where four others, that same year, had also stranded and perished; the other grounded about one hundred and seventy-two miles up. Notwithstanding the inhabitants obtained a great quantity of train oil from it, yet by reason of the swiftness of the current at that time, the whole river for two or three weeks acquired an oily taste, and exhibited an unctuous appearance, and the noxious effluvia were offensive eight miles off.”

—De Witt Clinton, An Introductory Discourse (Transactions of the Literary and Philosophical Society of New York, Vol. 1, note BB, p. 150), 1815

op. cit., p. 50

signatures

"Red eyes show a bold, brave man. Glittering eyes, which do not move readily, point out a hero, a high-minded, brave, quick man, formidable to his foes.

Large ears indicate good hearing, retentive memory, attention, diligence, a healthy brain and head. Depressed ears are a bad sign. For the most part they point out a man who is malicious, fraudulent, and unjust. They indicate bad hearing, treacherous memory, and a man who readily exposes himself to danger.

A long nose curved downwards is a good sign. It denotes a strenuous, provident man, occult and cruel, but still just.”

—Paracelsus, Concerning the Signature of Natural Things: Concerning the Astral Signs in the Physiognomy of Man, (Book 9 of De Natura Rerum, 177-78), 1537

op. cit., p. 237

Sep 29

cimex

"Once it’s fed, Cimex lectularius, a little brown, oval crawler, seems to wriggle and its elongated body resembles a tiny lashing tail. Travellers in earlier times are said to have gone about with a pig and introduced it into the bed a few hours before retiring: if there were bed bugs they would slake their thirst on the pig. Carrying a rasher of bacon in your wallet will not do the trick.”

—Jeremy Harding, Return of the Bedbug (London Review of Books, September 29 2010)

op. cit., p. 174