illustrirte

“Because of an early spelling mistake, the masthead of the Berliner Illustrirte Zeitung was printed with a spelling error all through the fifty years of its existence.”

István Deák, Weimar Germany’s Left-Wing Intellectuals: A Political History of the Weltbühne and Its Circle, 1968, p.40

op. cit., p. 153

Trinity Church, Lower Broadway, 1973. Photo from the U.S. National Archives.
op. cit., pp. 49, 51

Trinity Church, Lower Broadway, 1973. Photo from the U.S. National Archives.

op. cit., pp. 49, 51

language formed of gestures

"The first conception of a great man, is usually a fruitful germ. Well acquainted with the French grammar, he knew that every language was a collection of signs, as a series of drawings is a collection of figures, the representation of a multitude of objects, and that the Deaf and Dumb can describe every thing by gestures, as you paint every thing with colours, or express every thing by words; he knew that every object had a form, that every form was capable of being imitated, that actions struck your sight, and that you were able to describe them by imitative gestures; he knew that words were conventional signs, and that gestures might be the same, and that there could therefore be a language formed of gestures, as there was a language of words. We can state as a probable fact, that there was a time in which man had only gestures to express the emotions and affections of his soul. He loved, wished, hoped, imagined, and reflected, and the words to express those operations still failed him. He could express the actions relative to his organs; but the dictionary of acts, purely spiritual, was not begun as yet.”

Laurent Clerc, An Address Written by Mr. Clerc and Read by His Request at a Public Examination of the Pupils in the Connecticut Asylum, 1818, p. 4

op. cit., p. 37

with strings

Sarah Vaughan’s “Spring Can Really Hang You Up the Most” from her 1962 album Snowbound.

op. cit., p. 240

Martin Munkácsi, Liberia, 1931
op. cit., p. 152

Martin Munkácsi, Liberia, 1931

op. cit., p. 152

upright, and clearheaded

“In Oct. 1842, meetings were held in this hall, at one of which a public manifesto was issued, here quoted entire as a specimen of the public appeals of Chinese politicians and demagogues. […] ‘In 1838, our great emperor having fully learned all the crimes of the English, and the poisonous effects of opium, quickly wished to restore the good condition of the country and compassionate the people. In consequence of the memorial of Hwang Tsionhsz’, and in accordance to his request, he specially deputed the public minded, upright, and clearheaded minister Lin Tsehsū, to act as his imperial commissioner with plenipotentiary powers, and go to Canton to examine and regulate. He came and took all the stored up opium and stopped the trade, in order to cleanse the stream and cut off the fountain; kindness was mixed with his severity, and virtue was evident in his laws, yet still the English repented not of their errors, and as the climax of their contumacy called troops to their aid.’”

Samuel Wells Williams, The Middle Kingdom: A Survery of the Geography, Government, Education, Social Life, Arts, Religion, &c., of the Chinese Empire and Its Inhabitants, Vol. 1, 1848, p. 389-390

op. cit., p. 189

ninth

Simon Rattle discussing Mahler’s Ninth Symphony, with excerpts of his performance of the piece with the Berlin Philharmonic.

op. cit., p. 249-254

John Purroy Mitchel on November 5, 1913. Mitchel, one term mayor of New York City, failed in his bid for reelection four years later, and fell to his death in 1918 while flying with the Army Aviation Corps in Louisiana. Photo from the George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress).op. cit., p. 233

John Purroy Mitchel on November 5, 1913. Mitchel, one term mayor of New York City, failed in his bid for reelection four years later, and fell to his death in 1918 while flying with the Army Aviation Corps in Louisiana. Photo from the George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress).

op. cit., p. 233

kokoro

A brief feature on Kokoro, the blind wandering minstrel of Lagos.

op. cit., p. 37-38

collapse

"The winter of 2006/2007 witnessed large-scale losses of managed honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies in the United States. Those losses continued into the winter of 2007/2008. In the U.S., a portion of the dead and dying colonies were characterized post hoc  by a common set of specific symptoms: (1) the rapid loss of adult worker bees from affected colonies as evidenced by weak or dead colonies with excess brood populations relative to adult bee populations; (2) a noticeable lack of dead worker bees both within and surrounding the affected hives; and (3) the delayed invasion of hive pests (e.g., small hive beetles and wax moths) and kleptoparasitism from neighboring honey bee colonies. Subsequently, this syndrome has been termed Colony Collapse Disorder, or CCD."


—Dennis van Englesdorp et al., Colony Collapse Disorder: A Descriptive Study, PLoS ONE 4(8): e6481, 2009.

op. cit., p. 199